Neil Young – Homegrown (2020)

Plant that bell and let it ring

It is very entertaining to be a Neil Young fan. He change his mind as often as he makes plans. It’s a roller-coaster with a lot of waiting for albums that may or may not come out on time. It will be released in July is always the answer.

Recorded finished albums gets shelved and new stuff is done in days and released in a rush. He has an archive of unreleased stuff, both highly sought after studio material as well as a mother load of live stuff. One of the most famous unreleased albums is “Homegrown” from 1975. It was finished and almost out the door… The story is that when he was to play the record for the Band, he instead played songs from another album, “Tonight’s the night” that was recorded in 1973. So instead of releasing “Homegrown” in 1975 “Tonight’s the night” was let loose on the world. Neil said in an interview that he felt the “Homegrown” album was to personal…

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Deep Purple – Deep Purple in rock (1970)

Wait for the ricochet 

My introduction to Deep Purple came via a music group talent competition in my home town back in the eighties. A local group with a fantastic singer did “Child in time” as one of their numbers. Each band would play a handful of songs and then the audience voted which bands would go through to the next level. I was there mostly for my friends that did a set of Cure covers. They called themselves “The Funeral Party”. They didn’t win it all but we had a blast. The band with “Child in time” was one of my favourites due to the song and the performance of that young man. After that I soon found a used copy of “Live in Japan” and that was my ticket into Deep Purple.

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Neil Young – Rust never sleeps (1979)

It was that great Grand Canyon rescue episode

“Rust never sleeps” came out the last year of the seventies, the decade that gave us all those concept albums, and “Rust never sleeps” is Neil’s variant of a concept album, sort of. The first side of the album is all acoustic while the second side is all glory to electric boogie. This is an album that clearly can challenge to be Neil’s best album, or in the pantheon at least.

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Neil Young – Tonight’s the night (1975)

Please take my advice

I am not often in the mood for Tonight’s the night. It is too bleak and depressing, all about dead friends. The overall feeling of the album is as black as the cover. Rest in peace Bruce Berry and Danny Whitten.

Often an album is greater than the sum of its parts. For this album it is quite the opposite. The overall feeling I get is mostly sadness or maybe it is melancholy? But, there are some great songs on there nevertheless.

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David Bowie – The ‘Mercury’ demos (2019)

Dear Record Company man

How many releases from the “Space oddity” demos era can there be? This is getting absurd!

The Bowie estate has run amok with this. During 2019, celebrating 50 years since these recordings, they have released three super expensive vinyl things and one slightly less expensive 5-CD box. There has been a 4-vinyl singles box, a 3-vinyl singles box and one vinyl LP box with fancy packaging. I don’t care for singles, it is only a mess to change the speed on the turntable, and I thought the “The ‘Mercury’ demos” box was way too expensive. But I also have this OCD, I am a compulsive collector, and in the end, I needed to have it.

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Neil Young – Tuscaloosa (2019)

“Time fades away” redux

In October 1973 Neil Young released the live album “Time fades away”. It was the follow up to the smash hit album “Harvest” from the year before. But as always with Neil he did not pick the easy path and followed “Harvest” up with a similar album. Instead he offered a live album with eight unreleased songs. They were premiered during the Neil Young and the Stray Gators tour following “Harvest”. I have always found “Time fades away” a curiosity more than great. Yeah man, I love it but the songs are somewhat abrasive. Now Neil has released another live-album from the same tour.

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David Bowie – Live Santa Monica ’72 (2008)

Let yourself go

Bowies “Ziggy Stardust”-tour started in Aylesbury in January 1972 and ended in London in July 1973. At the end of the tour the shows included several songs from the recently released “Aladdin Sane” but during 1972 the shows showcased many older songs, including several from the 1971 album “Hunky Dory”. “Live Santa Monica ‘72” is recorded in October ’72 and part of the “early phase”. So how does this album do?

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Neil Young – Live at the Riverboat 1969 (2009)

Let me be your country man

This album is very similar to the recently reviewed “Sugar Mountain – Live at Canterbury House 1968”. Three months later, in February 1969, Neil played solo at the Riverboat coffee house in Toronto. Neil is very talkative and seems to be in a great mode. He has some fun anecdotes from his life. I get the feeling he is more relaxed or more at ease with the venue or perhaps, the audience. I love some of the banter with the audience and when he talks to Bruce Palmer.

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David Bowie – The rise and fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars (1972)

We move like tigers on vaseline

Ziggy played guitar, jamming good… “Ziggy Stardust” is an iconic album. It’s one of the best glam-rock albums ever and it’s on the short list for my albums that I have listened to the most in my life. It is filled with great songs, almost no weak points all through. All that said, I am still a little bit conflicted over exactly how great it is…

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Pink Floyd – A saucerful of secrets (1968)

“… clear that I’m not here.”

As much as I have loved Floyd over the years I have always divided their discography in two sections. The good part starts with “Meddle”, and the strange and unwelcoming part contains the five first albums. Today I’ll review one of the albums in that older group, the band’s second album “A saucerful of secrets”. It was released in 1968.

During the recording sessions, in January 1968, Syd Barrett was replaced by childhood friend David Gilmour. The band very briefly was a quintet and they did some shows in January 1968 as a five-piece band. But soon Barrett’s erratic behaviour made him impossible to work with.

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